Long read: Can data help the North's travel misery?

 

Transport is in crisis in the north of England. Cancelled, overcrowded and slow trains affect millions of people and the wider economy.

Both central and local governments agree that we need greater investment in, and local control over, transport services and infrastructure but we need more than physical transport infrastructure. Investment in data infrastructure (invisible but vital) is also needed to both solve the current problems and unlock the next generation of transport jobs and services.

UK transport industry challenges

Currently in the UK we lack access to good quality data about national transport investment; the availability and capacity of transport services; the volume of desired and actual passenger journeys; congestion on roads and even the price of bus journeys and which company offers them.

We need access to robust data to make good decisions – ranging from which route to take to work, through to public sector decisions about where and how to target investment.

”Local

Transport companies are not sharing data effectively, which has a detrimental impact on services. Passengers struggle to find the quickest and most cost-effective route. If they choose to travel by public transport then they want to buy a single ticket regardless of whether this involves a combination of metro, train, bus or taxi. 

In our 2017 paper - The case for government involvement to incentivise data sharing in the UK intelligent mobility sector, co-authored with Deloitte and the Transport Systems Catapult - we found that organisations weren't sharing the necessary data to enable effective, joined-up services.

We reported that unless action was taken, by 2025 the UK would lose £15bn of potential benefits. Some of this action could be taken by individual companies but others needed public sector support.

We also explored the ‘human elements’ of sharing transport data in our report Personal data in transport: exploring a framework for the future. We found that alongside inspiring innovation and the creation of better services, data sharing highlights the need for organisations to address critical questions of trust, ethics, equity and engagement in how data is used. This will become increasingly important as people grow more aware of data issues and as they gain more control over data about them.

International trailblazers

Meanwhile, other countries are taking steps forward:

  • France is at the forefront of driverless metro technology as detailed in our report Transport data in the UK and France
  • In the USA and China, governments and companies are investing heavily in driverless cars with trials taking place in multiple cities
  • The Ethics Committee of the German Federal Transport Ministry, with its own strong car industry, has published a code on automating driving describing the role of data, and providing guidance on vehicle behaviour.
  • New York’s Taxi and Limousine Commission has introduced rules requiring rideshare companies, like Uber and Lyft, to share detailed data about their journeys so that it can improve road planning.

The UK is currently behind the curve on realising the benefits of data in transport, and alongside the poor service provision, we risk missing out on the next generation of jobs and the tax revenue that comes with them.

Open data

Data is an emerging form of infrastructure that every sector of the economy relies on. At the moment, too much of our data infrastructure is unreliable, inaccessible, siloed or is not freely available. Data innovators struggle to get hold of it and to work out how they can best use it, while individuals do not feel that they are in control of how data about them is used or shared.

”Local

Open data is the foundation of this emerging vital infrastructure. Much of the data that helps with our public debates – such as the information about spend and congestion that helps us make investment decisions, and our personal decisions, such as the price of a bus journey – should be open for all of us to use.

To realise these benefits, we need private sector transport providers, central government and local transport authorities to open up more data.

For over 10 years, Transport for London has been openly publishing data (timetables, service status and disruption information), driving operational efficiencies, increasing use of the service and generating £130m of economic benefits in job creation and faster journeys.

To encourage similar initiatives across the UK will need more involvement from private sector transport providers who are more dominant outsideLondon. The benefits should be clear but if private sector providers cannot see them then it may need government to intervene, either directly or by giving more powers to local regulators.

Data standards

Other parts of data infrastructure need a different kind of investment. Open standards for data describes not just the format of data but also the rules by which it can be shared, and who with. We need the sector to work together to create better standards for transport data. Those standards might describe how personal data can be collected, shared and used. They should be accompanied with guidelines on the ethical questions to be asked and publicly debated as new services are being designed and built.

Data governance

Accompanying both open data and open standards for shared data is the need to invest in data governance. Governance to help align investment in data infrastructure with what people need, to ensure that data is made available in a way that creates equitable outcomes, and to help ensure that data is not misused.

We are all still working out at what level - city, sector, national and global - this data governance is needed, but the UK's existing transport regulators, like many other regulators, are generally unfamiliar with this type of data governance work and will need more skills if they are to take on the role.

It is investments and interventions like this that will tackle the data challenges we identified in our reports and help both create new jobs and improve our transport services.

The potential outcomes

Investing in data infrastructure alongside physical transport infrastructure is essential in the 21st century. It can:

  • unlock innovation.
  • create a share in what the Transport Systems Catapult estimates to be a £900bn industry by 2025
  • help to create better services, such as buying a single ticket, regardless of how many transport providers we use on a journey.
  • create more trust in new technologies like ride sharing services and driverless cars.
  • help us to make better transport investment decisions.

This requires a brave and fearless approach. Citizens want and deserve better services but many citizens are also fearful of data issues. Companies also instinctively want to keep data to themselves and are are often uneasy about making data more accessible.

The North needs greater investment in transport infrastructure but this won't deliver all of the potential benefits.

We need to be open with data and open minded to ideas; to win over passengers’ trust; to give them more control over and access to data; and look to a future where complaining about delayed trains and badly scheduled buses is no longer a British pastime.

Can the North repeat its 19th century trick in the 21st century, but this time by investing in data infrastructure alongside its transport infrastructure?

Whether you're a transport business, a transport regulator or the inventor of the next Rocket if you want help with tackling your own transport data challenges then get in touch with the ODI at info@theodi.org

Register now for full access


Register just once to get unrestricted, real-time coverage of the issues and challenges facing UK transport and highways engineers.

Full website content includes the latest news, exclusive commentary from leading industry figures and detailed topical analysis of the highways, transportation, environment and place-shaping sectors. Use the link below to register your details for full, free access.

Already a registered? Login

 
comments powered by Disqus
 
 
transport network jobs

CIVIL/STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

Torridge District Council
Up to £34,106 per annum plus relocation package up to £8,000
Looking for an experienced civil/structural engineer providing strategic feasibility and design advice to the authority Bideford, Devon
Recuriter: Torridge District Council

Highway Project Engineer

City of London
Up to £42,870 per annum (inclusive of London Weighting) depending upon performance.
The Department of Built Environment is responsible for the delivery of highway and drainage schemes within the City of London London (Central), London (Greater)
Recuriter: City of London

Graduate Transport Planner

Cambridgeshire County Council
£17,681 - £23,111
EXCITING GRADUATE OPPORTUNITY Cambridgeshire
Recuriter: Cambridgeshire County Council

Engineer Maintenance

Liverpool City Council
£32,233 - £37,107
Liverpool City Council are looking to recruit an Engineer Maintenance Liverpool, Merseyside
Recuriter: Liverpool City Council

Tree Services Programme Manager

Nottingham City Council
£37,107
You will be responsible for the management and maintenance of the Council's trees and woods, and will provide professional advice to others Woodthorpe, Nottingham
Recuriter: Nottingham City Council

Transport Coordinator

Camden London Borough Council
£32,473 to £37,670
We have an exciting opportunity for 2 highly customer focused Transport Coordinators to work in the busy Camden Transport Team. Camden, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Camden London Borough Council

Highway Electrical Supervisor (Highway Maintenance)

Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
£24,657 to £28,221
The post will support two Senior Lighting Engineers in leading and contributing to the delivery of the Street Lighting function for the Authority Bootle, Merseyside
Recuriter: Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council

Flood Risk Management Engineer

London Borough of Bexley
£31,353 to £36,876
We are currently seeking a Flood Risk Management Engineer who will have a lead role with the Flood Risk and Development Team Bexley (City/Town), London (Greater)
Recuriter: London Borough of Bexley

Senior Engineer (Traffic Signal Improvements)

Lincolnshire County Council
£34,106 - £38,052
This is a superb opportunity to lead, motivate and inspire our engineering team working on traffic signal improvement projects. Lincolnshire
Recuriter: Lincolnshire County Council

Senior Engineer (Traffic Signal System and Operations)

Lincolnshire County Council
£34,106 - £38,052
This is a superb opportunity to lead, motivate and inspire our engineering team working on traffic signal systems and operations. Lincolnshire
Recuriter: Lincolnshire County Council

Principal Engineer (Traffic Signals)

Lincolnshire County Council
£42,806 - £49,441
Do you want to lead, manage and motivate a team of engineers working at the cutting edge of technology? Lincolnshire
Recuriter: Lincolnshire County Council

Principal Nuisance Control Officer

Brent Council
£38,040 - £40,086 p.a. inc. + £4,800 shift allowance p.a.
Salary range
Recuriter: Brent Council

Rights of Way Search Officer - Highways Services

Bridgend County Borough Council
£7,188 - £7,327 per annum
We are seeking someone to assist in maintaining, developing and promoting the Definitive Map for Bridgend Bridgend (Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr)
Recuriter: Bridgend County Borough Council

Countryside Access Maintenance Officer - Highways Services

Bridgend County Borough Council
£12,644 - £13,015 per annum
We are seeking someone to assist in ensuring that the local rights of way network is protected, well maintained and enjoyed... Bridgend (Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr)
Recuriter: Bridgend County Borough Council

Principal Transport Officer

Cambridgeshire County Council
£37,320 to £40,198
The role will require close dialogue with developers and their agents and necessitate strong partnership working with District Councils... Cambridge, Cambridgeshire
Recuriter: Cambridgeshire County Council

Project Engineer

North Yorkshire County Council
up to £33,136
Are you a qualified Highways Project Engineer? Would you like to work in the famous James Herriot area of natural beauty? North Yorkshire
Recuriter: North Yorkshire County Council

Highways Officer Highways and Transport

North Yorkshire County Council
£28,2281 p.a.
Are you someone who is looking to progress their career with one of the most highly regarded highway services in the country? North Yorkshire
Recuriter: North Yorkshire County Council

Regional Strategy Officer

North Yorkshire County Council
Band 15 – up to £41,846
Are you an experienced Transport Planner? Do you have exceptional communication skills to build relationships within teams? North Yorkshire
Recuriter: North Yorkshire County Council

Area Manager

North Yorkshire County Council
up to £53,113 p.a. winter allowance plus 10% one off additional payment for exceptional candidates
Four Area Highway Managers roles available York, North Yorkshire
Recuriter: North Yorkshire County Council

Transport Planning Officer – Major Development Applications

Somerset County Council
£33,136 to £37,107
We have a fantastic opportunity in Somerset within our Highways Development Management team. Taunton, Somerset
Recuriter: Somerset County Council