Transport, planning and 'maximum parking standards'

 

UPDATE: Revised NPPF gives wriggle room on maximum parking standards. Click here to view reforms.

A major alliance of transport and planning groups has called for the Government to allow councils to set maximum parking standards for their areas under potential changes to the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), in order to combat urban sprawl and congestion.

The group states that maximum parking standards – whereby planning authorities can set an upper limit of off-street parking spaces for a development – are 'a very important tool in the planning and development of our towns'.

The news comes as the government considers responses to its draft revised text of the NPPF, following a consultation which closed on 10 May.

In response the Local Government Technical Advisers Group (TAG), the London Forum of Amenity and Civic Societies, the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation, the Transport Planning Society and the Campaign for Better Transport said they 'strongly support the need for maximum parking standards'.

The proposal made by the groups states that the Government should delete the first sentence of draft revised NPPF para 107, which reads: 'Maximum parking standards for residential and non-residential development should only be set where there is a clear and compelling justification that they are necessary for managing the local road network.’

Instead, according to the alliance, the NPPF should state: 'Local planning authorities should set local parking standards for residential and non-residential uses, expressed as maximum parking standards, taking into account:

  • the location of the development;
  • its accessibility by and availability of public transport;
  • the type, mix and use of development; and o the overall need to reduce the use of high-emission vehicles.

Analysis:

Transport Network spoke to Michael Bach, a senior adviser to TAG, who gave the following analysis in support of the proposed change:

‘The draft NNPF revision discourages the setting of maximum parking standards. If you don’t have maximum standards you either have no standards, which no one wants, or minimum standards, which could see some local authorities setting rising standards with the size of a housing development and they might have fairly relaxed standards to compete with neighbouring councils for office developments.

'The idea of maximum standards is to adjust to the locality. In an area with good public transport services you might adopt low maximum parking standards. We need standards that support the right development in the right place rather than unintentionally promote less sustainable patterns of development. What are they hoping for? Certainly not a free for all, but minimum parking standards would promote low density development.

‘The NPPF is a policy document and under this revised version it sets a clear disincentive for setting maximum standards. From about 2001 onwards most authorities have adopted maximum standards. This planned revision for the NPPF is turning the clock back. It’s not going to lead to higher density development. In London local authorities have been using maximum standards for the past 50 years. Who is saying that these standards are not suitable?

This is not an area the Government should be imposing a one-size-fits-all approach.

‘In setting standards, the NPPF advocates taking the local situation into account. However, the strong language is a real discouragement. It’s inappropriate. Local authorities only need to conform generally to the NPPF not in detail but they need to show why they have departed from it. The Planning Inspectorate must consider the NPPF and, as written, this is a very high test.’

Transport Network asked about current air pollution concerns and why the Government is proposing this change now.

‘There is a lack of joined up thinking. Someone will have lobbied for this revision to be written the way it is. There is no link with whatever else the Government might be trying to do.’

Register now for full access


Register just once to get unrestricted, real-time coverage of the issues and challenges facing UK transport and highways engineers.

Full website content includes the latest news, exclusive commentary from leading industry figures and detailed topical analysis of the highways, transportation, environment and place-shaping sectors. Use the link below to register your details for full, free access.

Already a registered? Login

 
comments powered by Disqus
 
 
transport network jobs

CIVIL/STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

Torridge District Council
Up to £34,106 per annum plus relocation package up to £8,000
Looking for an experienced civil/structural engineer providing strategic feasibility and design advice to the authority Bideford, Devon
Recuriter: Torridge District Council

Highway Project Engineer

City of London
Up to £42,870 per annum (inclusive of London Weighting) depending upon performance.
The Department of Built Environment is responsible for the delivery of highway and drainage schemes within the City of London London (Central), London (Greater)
Recuriter: City of London

Graduate Transport Planner

Cambridgeshire County Council
£17,681 - £23,111
EXCITING GRADUATE OPPORTUNITY Cambridgeshire
Recuriter: Cambridgeshire County Council

Engineer Maintenance

Liverpool City Council
£32,233 - £37,107
Liverpool City Council are looking to recruit an Engineer Maintenance Liverpool, Merseyside
Recuriter: Liverpool City Council

Tree Services Programme Manager

Nottingham City Council
£37,107
You will be responsible for the management and maintenance of the Council's trees and woods, and will provide professional advice to others Woodthorpe, Nottingham
Recuriter: Nottingham City Council

Transport Coordinator

Camden London Borough Council
£32,473 to £37,670
We have an exciting opportunity for 2 highly customer focused Transport Coordinators to work in the busy Camden Transport Team. Camden, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Camden London Borough Council

Highway Electrical Supervisor (Highway Maintenance)

Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
£24,657 to £28,221
The post will support two Senior Lighting Engineers in leading and contributing to the delivery of the Street Lighting function for the Authority Bootle, Merseyside
Recuriter: Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council

Flood Risk Management Engineer

London Borough of Bexley
£31,353 to £36,876
We are currently seeking a Flood Risk Management Engineer who will have a lead role with the Flood Risk and Development Team Bexley (City/Town), London (Greater)
Recuriter: London Borough of Bexley

Senior Engineer (Traffic Signal Improvements)

Lincolnshire County Council
£34,106 - £38,052
This is a superb opportunity to lead, motivate and inspire our engineering team working on traffic signal improvement projects. Lincolnshire
Recuriter: Lincolnshire County Council

Senior Engineer (Traffic Signal System and Operations)

Lincolnshire County Council
£34,106 - £38,052
This is a superb opportunity to lead, motivate and inspire our engineering team working on traffic signal systems and operations. Lincolnshire
Recuriter: Lincolnshire County Council

Principal Engineer (Traffic Signals)

Lincolnshire County Council
£42,806 - £49,441
Do you want to lead, manage and motivate a team of engineers working at the cutting edge of technology? Lincolnshire
Recuriter: Lincolnshire County Council

Principal Nuisance Control Officer

Brent Council
£38,040 - £40,086 p.a. inc. + £4,800 shift allowance p.a.
Salary range
Recuriter: Brent Council

Rights of Way Search Officer - Highways Services

Bridgend County Borough Council
£7,188 - £7,327 per annum
We are seeking someone to assist in maintaining, developing and promoting the Definitive Map for Bridgend Bridgend (Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr)
Recuriter: Bridgend County Borough Council

Countryside Access Maintenance Officer - Highways Services

Bridgend County Borough Council
£12,644 - £13,015 per annum
We are seeking someone to assist in ensuring that the local rights of way network is protected, well maintained and enjoyed... Bridgend (Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr)
Recuriter: Bridgend County Borough Council

Principal Transport Officer

Cambridgeshire County Council
£37,320 to £40,198
The role will require close dialogue with developers and their agents and necessitate strong partnership working with District Councils... Cambridge, Cambridgeshire
Recuriter: Cambridgeshire County Council

Project Engineer

North Yorkshire County Council
up to £33,136
Are you a qualified Highways Project Engineer? Would you like to work in the famous James Herriot area of natural beauty? North Yorkshire
Recuriter: North Yorkshire County Council

Highways Officer Highways and Transport

North Yorkshire County Council
£28,2281 p.a.
Are you someone who is looking to progress their career with one of the most highly regarded highway services in the country? North Yorkshire
Recuriter: North Yorkshire County Council

Regional Strategy Officer

North Yorkshire County Council
Band 15 – up to £41,846
Are you an experienced Transport Planner? Do you have exceptional communication skills to build relationships within teams? North Yorkshire
Recuriter: North Yorkshire County Council

Area Manager

North Yorkshire County Council
up to £53,113 p.a. winter allowance plus 10% one off additional payment for exceptional candidates
Four Area Highway Managers roles available York, North Yorkshire
Recuriter: North Yorkshire County Council

Transport Planning Officer – Major Development Applications

Somerset County Council
£33,136 to £37,107
We have a fantastic opportunity in Somerset within our Highways Development Management team. Taunton, Somerset
Recuriter: Somerset County Council